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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
>> barack obama calls for compromise as the u.s. approaches the brink of another economic crisis. in a rare appearance on a u.s. talk show he appealed to congress to make a deal to avoid tipping the country into recession. you're watching al-jazeera live from london. also coming up, 21 policemen are buried in pakistan after being kidnap and shot by the taliban. anger and grief in india. candlelit vigils continue as the 22-year-old gang rape victim is cremated. plus moments of impact -- amateur video captures a russian plane after it overshoots a runway and crashes into a motorway. hello, president obama has made another appeal to the u.s. congress to reach an agreement in the next 48 hours to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff. it's a term used to describe the expiry of tax cuts dating back to 2001. if there is no deal, 88% of americans will end up paying $400 billion more in 2014. that will be coupled with more than a trillion dollars in automatic government spending cuts. according to the congressional budget office it will start with $200 billion in military and social welfare c
u.s. spending for defense at $699 billion. >> we can reduce that by well over a $100 billion a year. >> the range of new threats include cyber threats, bio threats, and a host of non-state actors. >> how do you do all of this on the budgets we have for the armed forces given the debt situation we have in our own country? >> that's going to be, i think, in many ways the biggest debate within the military, if not, in society at large. (instrumental music) >> in a democracy agreement is not essential, but participation is. >> never before in our history have we been so inter-connected with the rest of the world. >> foreign policy is actually not foreign. >> america has faced great hardship before and each time we have risen to the challenge. >> the ultimate test is to move our society from where it is to where it has never been. >> join us as we explore today's most critical global issues. join us for great decisions. (instrumental music) >> great decisions is produced by the foreign policy association, inspiring america's to learn more about the world. sponsorship of great decisions i
gains. s&p strategist sam stovall joins us with where he sees stocks headed in 2013. that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! washington lawmakers are getting close to a fiscal cliff deal, but they might not get it done before the midnight deadline tonight. the senate could vote in time, but it's possible the house will wait until tuesday. that means the u.s. could go over the fiscal cliff. on wall street today, investors bought up stocks on high hopes of deal, after president obama said this afternoon a deal is "in sight," and positive comments from republican leaders in the senate. here's how e major averagesr closed on this last trading day of 2012. the dow surged 166 points, the nasdaq jumped about 60, and the s&p rose almost 24 points. while wall street has already closed the books on 2012, washington still has a few hours to go before its new year's day fiscal cliff deadline. darren gersh has the latest. >> reporter: after a weekend of late-night negotiations with the vice presidt, senate republican leader mitch mcconnell said an agreement on the fiscal cliff was very, very close.
would continue to grow, housing would continue to improve, but what's been holding us back is the dysfunction here in washington. and if, you know, people start seeing that on january 1st this problem still hasn't been solved, that we haven't seen the deficit reduction that we could have had had the republicans been willing to take the deal that i gave them, if they say that people's taxes have gone up, which means consumer spending is going to be depressed, then, obviously, that's going to have an adverse reaction in the markets. >> what about automatic spending cuts? those take effect january 1st, as well. do they have to be part of this deal? you've got half of those cuts in defense law? >> well, congress agreed they would cut an additional $1.2 trillion in spending. they put a committee together to try to come up with those numbers. they didn't figure out how to do it. so what we now have is a situation where these automatic spending cuts go into place. now, if we have raised some revenue by the wealthy paying a little bit more, that would be sufficient to turn off what
across the country. so each and every one of us here should look forward to the day with great interest and anticipation. the issues being debated today have been chosen by members of the youth parliament with the help of over a quarter of a million of your peers, and i think i'm right in saying and emphasizing of the five topics being debated, four were chosen by the public vote, and one by nyp themselves namely curriculum for life. today, of course, you debating whether to choosing the issue which you wish to have as your national campaign. this debate is one of the highlights of parliament week, and schools across the country have been taking part in create the debate, a project to encourage them to stage their own debates on the very issues which the u.k. yb are discussing in the combat. we know schools across the country are tuning in to watch and that is hugely welcome. just on process and housekeeping, let me say the following. first, nyp who wish to speak should stand in their place, or raise their hands if seated in a wheelchair. secondly, and most importantly, nyp should alway
a little later. there go the fireworks. yeah, it is officially new year's eve. >> 18 hours ahead of us. >> happy 2013 to those folks just a few hours away from us. good morning, everybody. i'm becky quick along with andrew ross sorkin. joe kernen is joining us from washington, d.c. this morning along with john harwood. joe, i know you have a huge lineup there. and i know you were up a little late last night, too, right? >> yes, becky, very late. you and andrew, i hope you guys are ready for the heavy lifting. can i ask you a question? are they over the cliff in new zealand, do you know? >> yeah, i guess that's it. >> the sequester would have gone into effect. >> no, that's probably only affecting us here, but that shows you how close it is. we are -- i guess something could happen at 11:00. we'll see, beck. andrew, good to see you, as well. >> good to see you. >> we've switched. i've got the jacket on, you've got the jacket off. how does that capital building look? >> it looks great behind you. you look very statesman like, absolutely. you have your rise above pin on for this final day
into the ground. >> so could you give some examples, number one, of this network that you talk about in the u.s., how it exists? >> in the u.s., for instance, after the invasion of iraq one of the major construction or reconstruction quote unquote ventures was, you know, commissions, somehow, or given somehow to various corporations that are very much in touch or close to or part of the network of, for instance, vice president dick cheney. whether it's halliburton, other companies, they ended up unfairly taking up these and they didn't do a good job at all by virtue of the result -- [inaudible]. these can networks -- another can of such network, if you would like to look at the much bigger scale, the entire seven to $800 billion bailout is a function of a very quote unquote legal state business network that operates that allows our system to bail out people that have caused the problem under legal pretense. the issue is in countries like syria. the money is much smaller, and the checks and balances that what is the media or the democratic process, and other civil society associations and power
us to you have, what you're talking about, what you were hearing. >> this is the framework of the deal they're discussing right now. as just detailed, the automatic spending cuts, that is the outstanding issue. this is what they locked up. end, rates of $400,000 per year, 450,000 tamales and from tax increases. as for capital gains and dividends, they stay the same. the alternative minimum tax, the state tax rose to 40 percent with a $5 million exemption. another one-year extension of long-term unemployment benefits. right now the issue is those spending cuts, the automatic spending cuts, the $94 billion known as the sequestered. but that we bring in a republican congressman from new jersey. thank you for joining us. the framework adjusted tailed, do you think it's something you could get behind? >> the president has repeatedly famously said that we can cut our way to prosperity and, of course, the flip side of that is even more true which is that we cannot tax our way to prosperity although mcconnell said that the tax portion is already worked out and agree upon, if you th
reached. >> i'm sure you'll continue to monitor it for us. we'll get back to you when there's something new to know. in the meantime, what are you supposed to do as an investor? we saw how the dow really swung during the president's speech. we saw the spike up and came back down and now we're seeing it through the day. why don't we bring in our cast of thousands here. ben willis, jason milly, brad fredelander, and of course rick santel santelli. ben let me get to you first of all. what do you feel this means beyond just the market moves today, the emerging deal what does it mean for the markets once we crack into the new year? >> we knew they could do it, it just took a long embarrassing cost of our reputation in the world to get it done. with that being said, i think you mentioned the capping on the tax deductions. you want to keep an eye on the high end housing and the high end buildings. if that does come to fruition. but the whole tape is moving. apple in and of itself is moving the nasdaq today. that may be a function of the idea of the continuation of the tax benefits for writeoff
, cultural, and economic ideas to the rest of the world. >> good afternoon. thank you for joining us here at the heritage foundation in our lewis lemon auditorium. we, of course, welcome those who joins honor heritage.org website on all of these. would ask everyone here in house if you'd be so kind to check cell phones one last time and see that they are turned off. thank you, louis. amazing how many speakers actually start doing that. we will post the program on a website within 24 hours for your future reference, and, of course, our internet viewers are always welcome to e-mail us with questions or comments, simply writing those to speaker@heritage.org. our guest today, doctor larry schweikart is a native arizonan turkey on this bachelor and masters degree at arizona state university and received his doctorate from university of california, santa barbara. throughout his high school and college, however, he spent most of his time playing drums in a variety of dance. as a rock, he was part of several groups, one of which opened for steppenwolf, among other performers for those old enough
've gotten us into, bring a balanced budget to the table to grow this economy for the long term not the short term. >> there you go. for the long term, not the short term. >> there you go. i'm don lemon. happy new year to you. jooirksz . >>> hello, i'm don lemon and this is cnn's top 10 of 2012. we look at the stories that captured our attention, what we see as the biggest stories of the year around the world, in crime, money, weather and even the biggestscandals and later this hour, those stories chosen by you. anchor of state of the union, candy crowley, with the top ten political stories of 2012. >>> like finding your favorite grain of sand on the beach. impossible number of possibilities. catch phrases become boomerangs. >> if you got a business you didn't build that. >> i like being aable to find service members. >> i'm an american woman who uses contraception. let's start there. >> it's like an etch-a-sketch. you shake it up and we start all over again. >> i'm not going to shut up. it's my turn. >> i think it's called romneysia. >> if i were to coin a term it would be obamaloney. >> the
businesses major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> can u.s. politicians reached a deal to stop tax rises in spending cuts from damaging the american and the global economy? hillary clinton is being treated at this hospital in new york. she has a blood clot. there's concern over the health of the venezuelan president who has suffered complications after cancer surgery in cuba. walk into bbc world news. coming up, and look back at the british troops as they prepared handover to afghan forces. new zealand becomes the first major city to welcome 2013. time is running out for politicians in the united states to strike a deal to prevent the economy from going over the so- called fiscal cliff. that is when a package of automatic spending cuts and tax rises comes into fact which could set the country back into recession. that less than 20 hours into the generate the first deadline. >> as night descended on washington, no deal precentors went home with a low over 24 hours to go before the huge austerity package known as the fiscal cliff, something almost nobody wa
for you. help you use that knowledge to navigate well in 2013. >>> here are the near-final figure y figures. one trader said to me we were lower friday because nobody wanted to go into the weekend long the market. now nobody wants to go short the market tonight in case they're able to get this deal done and vote on it in the next couple days. the dow at 13,106.98 to close out. the s&p up today. and a strong day for the nasdaq. up 2% right now at 3,019. >> certainly the market didn't seem to be particularly deterred by the news that john harwood just broke there, the fact it looks like no vote in the house tonight. which would mean technically we'd go over the cliff. but he still thinks a deal will be struck but just not tonight. 2012, check. it's in the books at least for the markets, that is. and while the clock keeps on ticking, no deal yet. what is an investor to do in the new year? >> edward pangin with us, james buckingham, rick santelli. everybody on board to pick apart what has just happened and what may happen going into the new year. what do you think? are you hopeful to ge
for free transcripts or to give us your comments about this program, visit us at q-and- a.org. >> tonight on the c-span bbc parliament's year-end review. and later another look at "q&a" with author kevin phillips. >> $50,000 in total prizes. the deadline's january 18th. for more information go to studentcam.org. >> next, "bbc parliament's westminster review" takes a look back at all the major reviews. the debates with the prime minister on the british economy and the european union budget. the british particle jment in recess for the holidays. members return on january 7th. >> hello there. and welcome to the west minister review. our look back at the big events in parliament over the last three months. coming up in this program, the chancellor delivers the latest bleak economic view? his budget. david cameron's bench urges him to stand up to europe. >> i support absolutely. >> the ugly spector of child abuse hits the deadlines with some dramatic consequences. lord justin levison delivers his plan on press standards. >> we should be wary of any legislation that has the pote
into this bill and the way he's worked cooperatively with all of us on both sides of the aisle and madam speaker, i urge my colleagues to join me in supporting this bill and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves. the chair will receive a message. the messenger: madam speaker a message from the senate. the secretary: madam speaker. the speaker pro tempore: madam secretary. the secretary: i have been directed by the senate to inform the house that the nat has passed without amendment h.r. 3641, cited as the national park act. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from utah. >> i have no fufert speakers and reserve the balance -- mr. chaffetz: i have no further speakers and reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from the district of columbia. ms. norton: i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from utah. mr. chaffetz: i would like to thank representative poe for introducing this legislation. the intill bipartisan in its approach, it creates a means for properly commemorating the cent
of that will be on hold obviously until they figure out what's going on. >> keep us posted for certain. we expect the best. back in 1998 she call it a blood clot and called it one of the scariest mediciedical experienc her life. >> if you had one before, you are at higher risk, and if you travel a lot, the blood flow may be compressed, benning your legs like that, and with the concussion, one of the things she was told was to rest. not easy for her to do, i can tell you for a fact. that may be part of the inactivity. >> and we don't know what the cause is. back in 1998, it was deep vain thrombosis. >> dvt, a clot in one of the leg veins, in and of itself, not a problem, but it can break off and go to the lungs, called a pulmonary embolism, she is on blood thinners, and you treat the brain clot. this is within one of the blood vessels in her legs. they haven't told us. >> what do they do about this? once you have had an episode of dvt, what's the treatment? >> blood thinners, you want to tip the balance a little bit so you are more likely to break up the clot. the downside, rumor likely to bleed if you inj
with. all right. >> we want to thank john harwood for joining us for the hour. we also want to thank tony and jared for being with us through this whole hour. >> and sitting through that. >> happy new year to everybody. and we should point out, look, fiscal cliff, market says, what, me worry at this point? >> i wonder what really did happen. did you get anything -- >> i think it was tony and i. >> not since we last talked. >> you guys get along well. as long as you're a steeler fan, you get along. it was great. thanks, guys. we've got to go. >> can you see this? we're giving out the fiscal cliff bars today. >> bye, everybody. happy new year, joe. right now, time for "squawk on the street." ♪ >> one final trading session for 2012. and it comes, of course, with the add eed drama of a fiscal cliff set to take place 15 hours from now. i'm carl, with melissa lee. cramer and faber are off today. good morning to you, dan. >> good morning. >> the house gaveling into session just a few moments ago. business there is going to start at 10:00 a.m. eastern time. futures are showing some resilie
to a recovery phase. tore used to in a recession have a deep downturn followed bay quite rapid recovery. it takes longer to readdress individual positions in their debt. and that means that it lasts much longer than everybody expects because everybody tries to save. >> so if things aren't very bleak across europe, why is it that in some countries as in greece and in spain we've seen the protest? >> i put greece out on its own because the magnitude of the downturn in greece has been phenomenal. it's had six recessive years. the loss of income is of the order of 20% to 30% on average. we've had nothing like that in this country. we're almost due to be back next year to where we were in 2007. it's not as though we've had a massive loss of income. so that's a fundamental loss of explanation. there are also cultural differences in some countries there is more of a tradition of having riots. if for instance, you contrast ireland and spain very similar pathologists a problem leading to the downturn. in ireland there were muted protest. in spain we've seen that the indignants have been on the s
over the centuries and a half. but this idea isn't fragile. when times get tough, it rallies us as one. every day, more people believe in the american idea and when they do, the dream comes true. we're grateful to be a part of it. [clock ticking] >> i pay the bills around here, so i'm gonna set the expectations. >> howard weyers is the boss; to some former workers, the boss from hell. if random tests find one of his workers has been smoking, he or she is fired. increasingly in the american workplace, big brother, or big boss, is watching you and your private life. >> what's important? this job-- and this is a very nice place to work--or the use of tobacco? make a decision. [clock ticking] >> americans work longer hours than nearly anyone in the developed world, even the japanese. >> good morning, everyone. >> for many professionals and corporate managers... >> super, super, super-duper hot. it's crazy. >> the 40-hour work week is history. >> daddy! >> okay, hold on just a minute. >> 60-to-80-hour work weeks are now the norm. >> you don't think you're working too much? >> no. >> do you?
, all the major averages were still showing positive performance for the year of 2012. meantime, the u.s. is set to reach the debt limit on monday. that, according to treasury secretary tim geithner in a letter to congress, though, he did say he expects to take what he called extraordinary measures to extend the government's borrowing ability for another two months or so. and even your cup of coffee wants a deal on the fiscal cliff. baristas at the 120 starbucks in washington, d.c. were encouraged by management to add a shot of bipartisanship to their drink orders and remind customers in our nation's capital to come together. >> wall street is typically quieter this time of year. of course, this last week of 2012 was marked by investor concerns over congress' new year's eve plans and that looming fiscal cliff. so what impact does it have on your money? alison deans is with us, senior adviser at varick asset management. nice to see you. happy new year. do you have two plans for 2012, one that includes the fiscal cliff and one that doesn't? how do you prepare for the new year as an investo
. going to greg but he went already. leave it there. thank you for joining us tonight and throughout the year. we have the greatest fans on the planet. thank you. we also wish a happy new year to bob and dana. cheers to you guys. here is to making my prediction the reality. "the five" number one in 2013. let's do it everybody. of course to the troops whose commitment to freedom keeps us safe, sound and secure. thanks to all. good night, everyone. be careful out there tonight. let's do this. >> kimberly: happy new year! >> oh, no! ♪ >> bret: two words you've likely heard too many times. "fiscal cliff." the country will officially go over it tonight. congress will miss a midnight deadline. so what now? will washington prevent significant economic fall-out come wednesday? this is "special report." ♪ ♪ good evening. i'm bret baier. when the giant crystal ball makes the last move in times square tonight, 2013 will officially be here. and so will the deadline. for a deal here in washington. politicians self-imposed fiscal cliff. the effort to make the consequences so unattractive for
? that's because almost every one of us is facing a major tax hike in our 2013 pay economics if congress does not reach the agreement on the fiscal cliff. right now there are still negotiations that are going on. they are being led by the vice president, vice president biden and senator minority leader mitch mcconnell. sources say that they are making some progress, but even if a deal is reached, no guarantee it's going to pass. listen to what one democratic senator, tom harkin, said on on the senate floor just earlier this morning. >> if we're going to have some kind of a deal, the deal must be one that really does favor the middle class, the real middle class, those making 30, 50, 60, $7,000 a year. that's the real middle class in america. as i see this thing developing, quite frankly as i've said before no deal is better than a bad deal, and this looks like a very bad deal the way it's shaping up. >> we want to bring in dana bash on capitol hill. when you think about it, both sides are not happy with what's taking place, at least what they're talking about. i know you have some new in
paragraph of euro bit wear. >> my obituary. >> what would you want us to say? would music be in the first sentence or two? >> no, i will say exactly what i said to the meerning extras. many singers. here lies ricardo muti, a crazy man that spent all his life trying to find a correct qafer or quarter note. >> rose: in pursuit of that your life was. >> that is a disaster. >> rose: but music has been good to you. >> very, very good. you know, music is the only art. and i know this by experience that can bring people together. and make people to communicate even if they don't speak the same language, if they have different religions. so when you left lascala, why did you leave? >> as i said, i was there for 19 years, longer than anybody elsement longer even than tuscanini and my relationship with the orchestra and chorus has been always for 19 years perfect. then when i had a fight with the administration, let's say, because i don't want to indicate this or that person, then everything became political. and in italy when something becomes political, and controversial, politically speaking the
that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the old year ticked down today, and with it went any hope of meeting the midnight "fiscal cliff" deadline. house republicans opted not to hold any votes on the issue tonight. so-- officially, at least-- more than $600 million in tax hikes and spending cuts begin taking effect tomorrow. in the meantime, senate republicans and the white house continue working on a possible deal. . >> are running out of time. americans are still threatened with a tax hike in just a few hours. >> new year's eve morning at the capitol began with a warning from senate majority leader harry reid. after a long weekend dush -- weekend of tense negotiations vice president joe biden had spent sunday dealing d
used to dry to domesticate this animal years ago. >> he's biting your arm. >> you saw how big the tigers were, full grown, they won't get that thick, you can see how thin it is. look at the ears, i don't mean worship the animal, but it reptded -- represented royalty back then. i'm sure a lot of people lost their hand trying to domesticate this cat. what's unique about this cat is one of the only cats in the world that can jump ten feet in the air and catch a bird flying. >> ten feet? >> only seen them twice in the wild. they live out in the jungles, the plains of kenya, tanzania, that part of the world. they don't exist much hardly up in egypt anymore. they lay down, watch for a bird and go plopping like that. because of their back legs are so powerful. >> ten feet is like huge. >> it's amazing. they can grab the bird going by. it's called a caracal cat. the ears give him away. >> very egyptian. what's next? we got the -- what are these? >> this is amazing. i didn't know we had this one on. this is a serval cat. this cat also is a cat that is from africa, and this cat also has
easy to establish one's distance from it. to construct the pastness of the past that is so close to us. and yet this is what historians have to do. our job is to complicate, to take apart our common sense view of the recent past, to interrogate what we think we know, to demiesfy, demythologize, to move beyond the cliches about winners and losers, saints and sinners, about the wisdom and courage of our forefathers, especially those of the greatest generation. our job as historians is to tell a different story, one grounded in evidence. the life of joseph p. kennedy was, for me, a sort of antique funhouse mirror which if i looked at it long enough would reflect back to me, often in hazy, indistinct, distorted forms, images of events, people, places which organized and arranged told the story of 20th century america. as a historian, i'm interested in origin, so i will tell you about the origin of this book. i was a colleague of arthur schlessinger or at the city university of new york. he introduced me to the kennedy family at a -- some event, i don't know what it was, a reception, a dinn
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)